September 27, 2022


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Reaction to the death of Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully, who entertained and informed Dodgers fans in Brooklyn and Los Angeles for 67 years. Scully, the longest-tenured single-team broadcaster in professional sports history, died Tuesday night at age 94.

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“He was the best there ever was. Just when you think of the Dodgers, there’s a lot of history here and a lot of people that have come through. It’s just a historic franchise. But it almost starts with Vin, honestly. When you think of Vin, he’s right up there with Jackie (Robinson). Obviously, it’s a different thing. But in terms of the history of our organization, Vin had it all. Just such a special person. I am thankful and grateful that I got to know him as well as I did.” — Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers pitcher.

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“Obviously he lived a terrible life. It affected so many, including me. I feel honored to be able to call him a friend. I think there are countless people who consider him family and part of their families. This is a guy who was not only the voice of Dodger baseball, but baseball in general. He was in so many houses. It’s a legacy of longevity, it’s class, and I used the phrase earlier — he was a gentleman. — Dave Roberts, Dodgers manager.

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“You gave me my name Wild Horse. You gave me love. You hugged me like a father. I will never forget you, my heart is broken. My hand in the hearts of your family. Los Angeles, I’m sorry I’m not there with you today to cry together.” — Yasiel Puig, former Dodgers outfielder, via Twitter.

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“I grew up with Vin Scully’s voice and poetic sounds. He made listening to Baseball fun and educational. Just the best!!” — Ozzie Smith, 15-time All Star shortstop, via Twitter.

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“He meant so much to so many and there will never be another like him. Rarely do your childhood heroes exceed your expectations when you meet them and yet somehow, Vinny did. May he forever rest in peace.” — Josh Rawitch, president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, via Twitter.

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“The first time I met him, I was actually with the Mets in town playing the Dodgers and he came down to the clubhouse to say hi and told me he was a fellow redhead and us redheads should stick together. I thought it was crazy that Vin Scully walked into the club to find me and say hi.” — Justin Turner, Dodgers third baseman.

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“It’s just a huge loss, not only for the Dodgers but for baseball in general. So he just has to pray for his family.” — Mookie Betts, Dodgers outfielder.

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“I will never meet anyone as kind, as gracious, as talented as Vin. Twitter is not big enough for all the memories, stories, instances of a person who was the best at what he did behind a microphone and who was an even better person than he was a broadcaster. Rest in peace my friend.” — Ned Colletti, former Dodgers general manager, via Twitter.

“The largest broadcaster of baseball and other sports is gone. I lost the architect of my professional life, a dear friend: Vin Scully. Now I find myself in the most difficult task of articulating my thoughts and I can only say peace to his grave, see you soon.” — Jaime Jarrín, Hall of Fame broadcaster and Spanish voice of the Dodgers.

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“I am deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Vin Scully — baseball’s greatest announcer who set the standard for all play-by-play broadcasters in any sport. Vin was a good friend and a kind man.” — Bob Miller, Hockey Hall of Famer and announcer for the Los Angeles Kings for 44 years.

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“OMG. Such sad news. A great man and the greatest sports champion to ever call a game. His voice will live on in our minds and hearts forever. RIP dear Vin.” — Ralph Lawler, former voice of the Los Angeles Clippers for 41 years, via Twitter.

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“Growing up in LA, he was the voice I always heard. When I played my first major league game against the Dodgers, we were playing them in Toronto. The next day, I was watching my at-bats from that game. The sound was on and normally the sound wasn’t on, but I put it on and I heard Vin Scully talking about me being a hometown guy from California. It meant the world to me. It was a really chilling moment for me as soon as I heard him say my name.” — Chris Woodward, Texas Rangers manager and former Dodgers manager..

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“A true gentleman and the greatest storyteller to ever sit behind a microphone. Calm down, Vin.” — San Diego Padres via Twitter.

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“Vin Scully was bigger than baseball. He was the soul of Los Angeles, the undisputed voice of America’s hobby and the narrator of some of the most exciting moments of our lives. It’s impossible to think of the Dodgers without thinking of Vin’s incomparable way with words and the limitless wisdom he shared with generations of fans around the world.” — Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

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“The heart of a city. A voice that bridged generations. An iconic storyteller who through his words brought to life so many summer nights and autumn evenings. We have lost a true legend. RIP Vin Scully.” — Los Angeles Chargers via Twitter.

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“His last home game at Dodger Stadium. You know, I got lucky right now, get off the homer to win the division. And then we’re all celebrating and showing moments now where we all just turned our attention to Vin and his wife, Sandra. It was a very nice moment.” — Texas Rangers shortstop Charlie Culberson, whose homer ended Scully’s final home run of 2016.

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“Growing up in LA, you could hear the sound of Vin Scully’s melodic voice blaring from gas stations and portable radios all summer long. We had a chat once and, in front of a rapt audience, he was an effortlessly compelling storyteller. And a proper gentleman… RIP, Vin.” — Harry Shearer, actor and comedian, via Twitter.

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“Vin Scully was a master of his craft. Born in New York, his unmistakable voice will forever be synonymous with Los Angeles.” — California Governor Gavin Newsom.

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More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sport





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